Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Betty MacDonald, Betty MacDonald biography, documentary and a quiet revolt

Bildergebnis für betty macdonald


mrs. piggle wiggle, hello_english_cassette_FRONT

Pippi, you're the best. 

Hello 'Pussy' it's Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle and Pippi Longstocking: 

As you strain alliances and relationships around the world, some of the nation’s top career diplomats are breaking publicly with you, in what amounts to a quiet revolt by a cadre of public servants known for their professional discretion.


Betty MacDonald fan club fans,

Betty MacDonald fan club fans from all over the world are very interested in Wolfgang Hampel's interviews, stories and poems.

You'll be able to read some of Wolfgang Hampel's new satirical stories and poems in  Betty MacDonald fan club newsletter June. 

Wolfgang Hampel is journalist, author, artist and poet.

He is the winner of first Betty MacDonald Memorial Award.

As we all know Wolfgang Hampel founded Betty MacDonald fan club and Betty MacDonald Society in 1983.

Betty MacDonald Fan Club has members in 40 countries.

Wolfgang Hampel visited all the places where Betty MacDonald and her family lived.

Wolfgang Hampel's new Betty MacDonald documentary of Betty MacDonald's life in Boulder, Butte, Seattle, Laurelhurst, Chimacum, Vashon Island, Carmel and Carmel Valley is really fascinating. My personal favourites are scenes of Betty's and Don's life in Carmel and Carmel Valley.

Wolfgang Hampel, author of Betty MacDonald Biography, interviewed Betty MacDonald's family and friends and many other famous artists and writers, for example Astrid Lindgren, Truman Capote, J. K. Rowling, Maurice Sendak, David Guterson, Donna Leon, Ingrid Noll, Marie Marcks, William Cumming, Walt Woodward and Betty MacDonald fan club honour members Monica Sone, Letizia Mancino, Darsie Beck and Gwen Grant. 

Wolfgang Hampel is also very well known for his satirical poems and stories.

We are going to share Wolfgang Hampel's work with many fans from all over the world who adore his Betty MacDonald Biography and unique Betty MacDonald Interviews. 

Wolfgang Hampel's newest literary project is Vita Magica. 

Vita Magica is a monthy very successful event since July 2015.

Bildergebnis für Theresia Bauer

Minister of Science of Baden-Württemberg Theresia Bauer invited Wolfgang Hampel and the Vita Magica guests to Landtag in Stuttgart in December 2016.

It was a very interesing and fascinating day. 

Theresia Bauer was guest reader at Vita Magica 2016 and the feedback was outstanding. She introduced some of her favourite books. 

Many visitors ordered the books Theresia Bauer was reading from. 

Theresia Bauer will be guest reader at Vita Magica June 2017.



you can join 

Betty MacDonald fan club

Betty MacDonald Society  

Vita Magica  

Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 

on Facebook

Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen

Vita Magica 

Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 

Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook

Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund  

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Greta Larson


Some U.S. Diplomats Stage Quiet Revolt Amid Tensions With Trump

Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson, second from left, with his Australian counterpart, Julie Bishop, and Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, right, with his counterpart, Marise Payne, in Sydney on Monday. Credit Pool photo by Mark Metcalfe

WASHINGTON — As President Trump strains alliances and relationships around the world, some of the nation’s top career diplomats are breaking publicly with him, in what amounts to a quiet revolt by a cadre of public servants known for their professional discretion.
On Monday, the chargé d’affaires at the American Embassy in Beijing, David H. Rank, announced his resignation after telling his staff he could not defend the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord.
A day earlier, the acting ambassador to Britain, Lewis A. Lukens, tweeted his support of London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, in the wake of a deadly terrorist attack there. On Sunday morning, President Trump had picked a fight with the mayor on Twitter.
Last month, the ambassador to Qatar, Dana Shell Smith, reacted to Mr. Trump’s dismissal of the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey, by tweeting, “Increasingly difficult to wake up overseas to news from home, knowing I will spend today explaining our democracy and institutions.”

The State Department has been a hotbed of resistance to the Trump administration’s policies from the start. About 1,000 staff members signed a cable protesting the temporary ban on visas for visitors from seven predominantly Muslim countries the administration tried to impose in January. There has been a small exodus of senior diplomats, which, combined with the slow pace of appointments, has left the State Department’s headquarters noticeably depleted.

But the tensions between the White House and the diplomatic corps are now flaring up more publicly, and at a more senior level. Mr. Lukens, Mr. Rank, and Ms. Smith have all spent decades in the Foreign Service, rising to posts at or close to the ambassadorial level.
“It’s an extraordinarily unusual situation for the Foreign Service,” said R. Nicholas Burns, who served as undersecretary of state for political affairs in the George W. Bush administration, traditionally the top-ranking position for career diplomats. “They pride themselves on being nonpartisan. You serve each president 150 percent.”
Mr. Burns said the conflicts were more difficult for diplomats at the senior level because their jobs require them to represent or issue statements on behalf of the United States government, sometimes with little guidance from the State Department.

The diplomatic area of Doha, Qatar, in 2013. A host of multinational corporations have operations in each of the feuding nations. Credit Fadi Al-Assaad/Reuters

In Mr. Rank’s case, several friends said, he had been directed to present the White House’s rationale for withdrawing from the Paris climate accord to the Chinese government. He told colleagues at a town-hall meeting at the embassy that he could not defend the policy.

Friends said Mr. Rank, who became chargé d’affaires in Beijing in January, was deeply frustrated by the general direction of American policy toward China, but particularly about climate change. He was scheduled to serve until the arrival of Terry Branstad, the former governor of Iowa, who was confirmed as Mr. Trump’s ambassador to China in May.

The climate agreement struck between the Obama administration and the Chinese government in 2014 laid the groundwork for the global agreement signed in Paris. China’s official media has been scorching in its criticism of Mr. Trump’s decision to withdraw from it.
Mr. Rank did not reply to an email seeking comment. Friends said he was on his way back to the United States.
A State Department official, speaking on background because he was not authorized to discuss personnel matters, characterized Mr. Rank’s resignation as a “personal decision.” He declined to say whether it involved climate policy.

A 27-year veteran of the Foreign Service and fluent speaker of Mandarin, Mr. Rank also served in Taiwan, Greece and Mauritius. In recent years, he worked extensively on Afghanistan, serving as the Afghan desk director in Washington and political counselor in Kabul.

“He was a complete pro, extremely well-regarded,” said Daniel F. Feldman, a former special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan. “In all his years working for me, I never even knew his politics; exactly what you’d hope for from a career Foreign Service officer.”
In Mr. Lukens’ case, the flap was less about principle than a case of mixed signals with the White House. The statement he put out on Sunday, in the wake of the deadly attack on Saturday night, was the kind of statement issued routinely by embassies all over the world.

Mr. Lukens, 53, said in an email that he did not obtain clearance from the State Department for the tweets he posted on Sunday on the embassy’s Twitter account because it was standard practice to express support and condolences to a host country after a terrorist attack.

“I commend the strong leadership of the @MayorofLondon as he leads the city forward after this heinous attack,” Mr. Lukens wrote, adding praise in another post for the “extraordinary” response of the emergency services, law enforcement, and London officials.

Earlier that day, Mr. Trump tweeted, “At least 7 dead and 48 wounded in terror attack and Mayor of London says there is ‘no reason to be alarmed!’” His post misrepresented Mr. Khan, who had told Londoners not to be alarmed by the heavy police presence on the streets after the attack.
On Monday, the president continued his attack against Mr. Khan, the city’s first Muslim mayor, labeling his explanation of his remark about the public not being alarmed as a “pathetic excuse” and accusing the news media of “working hard to sell it.”

Ambassador Smith, who continues to serve in Qatar, could not be reached for comment. Over the weekend, she retweeted a post supporting Mr. Khan from the mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti.

The divergence between Mr. Lukens and the president drew immediate attention on social media, with some praising the envoy for his grace and humanity and others calling for his head.
Several noted that Mr. Lukens worked for Hillary Clinton when she was secretary of state and played a role in setting up the communications system she used, which allowed her to send and receive email on a private server using a personal email address.

Mr. Lukens, whose father was ambassador to the Republic of Congo, became a familiar figure to the diplomatic press corps as the coordinator of Mrs. Clinton’s overseas trips. He is an affable, low-key diplomat who colleagues said was unlikely to go rogue.
A 28-year veteran of the Foreign Service, Mr. Lukens was named ambassador to Senegal and Guinea-Bissau by President Barack Obama, after tours in Canada, Ivory Coast and China. He became the acting ambassador in London in January after the White House recalled Mr. Obama’s envoy, Matthew Barzun.

Mr. Burns said, “There’s no question he used his best judgment yesterday.” But the State Department official said only that Mr. Lukens’ tweets “speak for themselves.”